tweeters beware

News Mash: Twitter addictive and inspires lawlessness? A little bit, yeah…

Cravings.

We all get them from time-to-time…

Depending on that irresistible passion we desire to have above all others…

Even if it is bad for us.

Some of us however?

Able to resist the sirens song.

When it comes to social networking site Twitter, when compared to other addictions?

Oh…

We are a little LESS able to resist.

[via Guardian] Tweeting or checking emails may be harder to resist than cigarettes and alcohol, according to researchers who tried to measure how well people could resist their desires.

They even claim that while sleep and sex may be stronger urges, people are more likely to give in to longings or cravings to use social and other media.

A team headed by Wilhelm Hofmann of Chicago University’s Booth Business School say their experiment, using BlackBerrys, to gauge the willpower of 205 people aged between 18 and 85 in and around the German city of Würtzburg is the first to monitor such responses “in the wild” outside a laboratory.

The results will soon be published in the journal Psychological Science.

[…]

The researchers found that as the day wore on, willpower became lower. Their paper says highest “self-control failure rates” were recorded with media. “Resisting the desire to work was likewise prone to fail. In contrast, people were relatively successful at resisting sports inclinations, sexual urges, and spending impulses, which seems surprising given the salience in modern culture of disastrous failures to control sexual impulses and urges to spend money.”

[…]

Hofmann told the Guardian: “Desires for media may be comparatively harder to resist because of their high availability and also because it feels like it does not ‘cost much’ to engage in these activities, even though one wants to resist. [Read More]

And more often than not?

Yes…

Caving in to the Twitter craving comes to our detriment.

[via io9Further evidence that Twitter will not liberate the world

Though optimistic pundits have declared Twitter largely responsible for social uprisings like Arab Spring, the microblogging network is hardly going to usher in a more liberated future. It’s a business, after all, and it bends to the law like every other business does. Over at Foreign Policy‘s Passport, Uri Friedman counts the ways that Twitter looks more like a tool of the present than a harbinger of better tomorrows.

He writes that people who “threaten violence” on Twitter have been arrested:

Earlier this week, DHS agents detained Irish traveler Leigh Van Bryan and a friend at Los Angeles International Airport and sent them back to Europe after Bryan tweeted that he was going to “destroy America” and dig up Marilyn Monroe during his trip — references, he later told officials, to partying and the comedy show Family Guy, respectively (the incident conjured up memories of other jokes gone awry, such as when the Onion enraged the U.S. Capitol Police by tweeting, “BREAKING: Witnesses reporting screams and gunfire heard inside Capitol building”). In 2009, FBI agents arrested an Oklahoma City man named Daniel Knight Hayden for threatening on Twitter to kill police officers during a Tea Party tax protest. Hayden was sentenced to eight months in prison.

Saying something on Twitter, it seems, is basically the same thing as saying it straight to a police officer’s face. [Read More]

Crazy isn’t it?

Just how far one will go…

To be able to get a hit of a quick fix.